A Stormy Night


A stormy night is a fearful night. If the wind blows violently, it becomes a storm. It lashes tremendously everything that lies on its way. It breaks and sweeps away things with a strong force. Thus it causes a terrible havoc. When it occurs in the dark of the night, it seems all the more terrible. Thick clouds cover the whole sky. Deep darkness envelops the environment. Rains pour torrentially. Sometimes it drizzles also. Peals of thunder together with flashes of lightning seize the people with fright and dread. They feel helpless and utter prayers to God to stop the scourge. Now and then there may be a state of lull. But this is followed by blasts of a greater force. Eventually, they blow off the roofs of houses, uproot the trees and plants, sweep away the mutilated corrugated tins and broken branches of trees. People raise a hue and cry. Their shouts and shrieks frighten the others. When, at last, the storm abates, the people come out with hurricane lanterns or fagot torches to see the havoc. They exchange information of the locality and start relieving operations. They remove from their yards and paths the fallen banana trees, broken branches, and other objects and gather their damaged materials. A stormy night is, therefore, an accursed night of fear and destruction.